The World’s Largest Translation Charity

In 1993, Lexcelera owners Ros Smith-Thomas and Lori Thicke founded Traducteurs sans frontières with the goal of creating a community of professional translators to support humanitarian work with pro bono translation services. For 17 years, Traducteurs sans frontières, registered in France as a charity under the 1901 law governing nonprofits, provided daily support to organizations such as Medecins sans frontières, Action Against Hunger and Handicap International.

In 2010, following the devastating earthquake in Haiti, Lori Thicke founded a sister organization to Traducteurs sans frontières: Translators without Borders. In 2011, Translators without Borders became a 501 (c) 3 registered charity in the United States. Today Translators without Borders is the world’s largest charity providing translation support to people the world over.

Since its creation, Translators without Borders has donated tens of millions of words to over 400 non-profits. This represents a donation of more than $5 million as of 2016.The community currently counts more than 3000 professional translators who give generously of their time and skills.

In a crisis, Translators without Borders is often “activated” by the United Nations to provide crisis translations. Recent examples include Pashto, Dari and Arabic for the refugee crisis in Europe; Tagalog, Cebuano and Waray-Waray after Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines; and Hausa, Krio and Temne during the Ebola outbreak. Translators without Borders has also established a translator training centre in Nairobi, Kenya. In addition to projects such as translating Wikipedia health information into local languages for reading on mobile phones, and translating storybooks for African schoolchildren, the centre has trained over 100 African language translators.

Translators without Borders in the News

Translators without Borders has been featured in many publications and broadcasts including The Guardian, Public Radio International, NPR, The ATA Chronicle, The New York Times and the BBC.

 

BBC World Service

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